Is “Daylighting” The Secret To A Happier Wellbeing?

OK, you probably clicked on this post thinking “wtf is daylighting?” Don’t worry, it has nothing to do with “moonlighting,” so I’m not here to convince you to pick up another job. So what is daylighting? Simply put, it’s the illumination of natural light in your living space. Sounds simple enough, right? But you’d be surprised how much natural light has an effect on our overall wellbeing. Imagine sitting at your desk every day or sitting on your couch in the morning with no windows. It’s like a kid looking out of the classroom window yearning for recess. Even if you find your home already has sufficient natural light, there are little ways you can improve your everyday settings to increase productivity and feel better overall.

We spend roughly 90 percent of our time indoors. But the more we begin to focus on health and wellness, the more we realize that instead of building against nature, we should be incorporating more natural elements into our homes. Studies have shown that when we’re connected to nature and embrace natural light, we are actually healthier, more productive and more focused.

Designing your home around daylighting, by incorporating as much natural light into your space as possible, has myriad benefits. But, I know, not everyone has the square footage or ability to flood their home with sunlight. Here are a few simple hacks to help you bring in more natural light to your home:

Use matte paint

It might seem like glossy paint would make more sense, but in fact, matte paint actually reflects light in all directions whereas gloss paint can just cause a glare.

Hang lots of mirrors

You can easily double the amount of light in a room by hanging a few chic mirrors. Hang your largest mirror directly across from the window in your living space, and let the light bounce off reflective surfaces. Paintings and posters absorb light. Consider removing dark hangings on your wall and replacing with decorative mirrors.

 

Trim the trees outside your space

No, do not cut them down. We need trees! Try trimming the trees or bushes outside your space to help remove any light obstruction. If you rent, ask your landlord if this is an option or something you could possibly pay for since it’s cosmetic.

Move furniture

Keep furniture away from windows or glass doors. Instead of pushing them directly up against the wall, try arranging your furniture layout so that these pieces are a few feet away from it. This way, you can remove any blockage from any angle. This especially goes for bookcases. Bookshelves should never be parallel from a window, it automatically blocks light from reflecting within the room. Place your bookcase perpendicular to window walls for the best results.

Embrace light colors

The lighter the colors, the more light reflects. Opt for light wood flooring, and neutral wall colors like mushroom or eggshell. This also goes for furnishings and textiles. Dark pieces make the room feel heavier and soak up light like a sponge. Try for neutral rugs and throw pillows if you can’t afford to refurnish the entire space.

 

Clean your windows

I know this one seems obvious, but it truly does make a difference. You’d be surprised how much dust and debris is blocking your natural light, no matter how clean you think your windows already are.

Be sure to read All The Things You Need To Have Your Most Productive Month, and 8 Books To Add To Your September Reading List!

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Author: Samantha Welker

Samantha Welker is the business manager at Glitter Guide. She has an Master's in Corporate Finance & Sustainability from Harvard Business School but prefers working in the creative industry. She also hosts a weekly business podcast for creative women called Pretty Okay Podcast. She loves spending time with her husband and her son, Rocky, in sunny San Diego. Follow along on Instagram